2014 IFCBA World Conference

The International Federation of Customs Brokers Associations held its bi-annual world conference "Celebrating 25 Years of Trade Facilitation through Expertise and Innovation" in Seoul, Korea from May 13-17, 2014. Please click here for the press release and for the new IFCBA executive team. 

About the IFCBA

The IFCBA has been representing the interests of the worlds' customs brokers and their clients since 1990. Many of our member asoociations have been involved in similar activities within their own countries for nearly a century. » more

Recent News

"Frequently companies do not have the necessary import and export compliance procedures in place, including some well-known publicly traded companies. In many cases, even if they have internal controls, they are often outdated or not being followed," according to Adrienne Braumiller, Founder, Braumiller Law Group, PLLC.

As a law firm participating in the marcus evans Chief Litigation Officer Summit Fall 2014, taking place in Palm Beach, Florida, September 14-16, Braumiller gives Chief Litigation Officers advice on minimizing compliance risks that may remain undetected for years.

This has been excerpted from the 27 August 2014 issue of AjaxWorld Magazine and is available in its entirety at:
http://ca.sys-con.com/node/3161987

Press reports indicate that the World Trade Organization has again ruled against U.S. regulations on the country of origin labeling of meat products. The decision brings the U.S. one step closer to billions of dollars’ worth of retaliatory sanctions against its exports to Canada and Mexico.

The 2008 Farm Bill revised the previous mandatory COOL requirements to provide that in order for a commodity to be labeled as a product of the U.S. all production activities associated with the commodity have to occur on U.S. soil or in U.S. waters. For products produced in the integrated North American marketplace, the label must indicate every country in which a stage of production has taken place. The 2008 Farm Bill also imposed mandatory COOL requirements for muscle cuts of beef (including veal), lamb, chicken, goat and pork; ground beef, lamb, chicken, goat and pork; wild and farm-raised fish and shellfish; perishable agricultural commodities; macadamia nuts; pecans; ginseng; and peanuts.

This has been excerpted from a 26 August 2014 news item by Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg and is available in its entirety at:
http://www.strtrade.com/news-publications-COOL-meat-labeling-WTO-sanctions-082614.html

Japan's trade deficit rose in July from the month before to a wider than expected 964 billion yen ($9.4 billion), though exports were higher for the first time in three months, the government said Wednesday.

It was the 25th straight monthly trade deficit for the world's third-largest economy, due mainly to an increase in imports of oil and gas to compensate for idled nuclear reactors following meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant in 2011.

This has been excerpted from a 26 August 2014 article in the Canadian Press and is available in its entirety at:
http://www.thecanadianpress.com/english/online/OnlineFullStory.aspx?filename=DOR-MNN-CP.c5ff0ea5f3ce4f01b80e5380ca1687e5.CPKEY2008111300&newsitemid=29557937&languageid=1

The Chinese government continues to increase trade cooperation with the rest of the world in order for the Chinese economy to grow long term. Recently, new FTAs have been signed, more are under negotiation, and Chinese cooperation with other Asia-Pacific countries is deepening.

In this issue, we focus on China’s policy reforms, the cooperation with other countries and FTAs, and the retailing challenge from Shanghai FTZ. This newsletter is for informational purposes only, and we encourage you to reach out to your local Customs Authorities or compliance consultants should you have questions on these programs.

This newsletter, by Integration Point, which provides information on global trade and compliance happenings in China is available here:
http://www.integrationpoint.com/newsletters/china-trade/china-trade_August2014.html

Goods from the list of Russia’s response sanctions which are currently on board the ships in Russian seaports should be re-exported under Russian legislation. According to the recommendation given by Saint-Petersburg based law office Inmarine, this will let decrease the costs.

“The Federal Customs Service gives no official instructions on further actions of shippers and cargo owners. Demurrage will cause arguments about force majeure circumstances so the efforts of all the parties involved should be focused on reduction of losses. Re-export and transportation of cargo to other countries for sale or storage seems to be the best solution. Since customs services control the country of origin it will be impossible to legally delivery such goods to Russia during the year-long period,” the statement of Inmarine says.

Practical experience shows that the ban or restriction of imports from certain states results in stricter customs control in respect of all goods from the list, regardless the country of origin. To ensure legality of import, customs inspections can become more frequent leading to delays in customs clearance or perishing of cargo, Inmarine experts say.

This is from the 20 August 2014 issue of PortNews and is available at:
http://portnews.ru/news/185645/